The Attributes of God

After the plea in Psalm 5:1–3, David begins to think through the day that spreads out before him, giving extra consideration to those he would encounter. His song addresses four specific realms of interest (Psalm 5:4–11).

  1. David meditates on the Lord Himself (5:4–6).
  2. David describes himself (5:7–8).
  3. David describes his enemies (5:9–10).
  4. David describes the righteous (5:11).

Let's examine each realm of interest, beginning with the first: God Himself.

For You are not a God who takes pleasure in wickedness;
No evil dwells with You.
The boastful shall not stand before Your eyes;
You hate all who do iniquity.
You destroy those who speak falsehood;
The LORD abhors the man of bloodshed and deceit.

He mentions seven specific things about his Lord:

  • He takes no pleasure in wickedness.
  • No evil will "dwell" with Him (literally).
  • Arrogant boasters will not stand before Him.
  • He hates workers of iniquity.
  • He destroys those who lie.
  • He abhors murderers.
  • He abhors deceivers.

Why does David review these things? Because it is therapeutic to review the attributes of God—to remind ourselves that He is always good, and that He is always right in His ways. His love for us never fails and His timing is perfect. Many of the pent-up angry feelings and frustrations of our inner emotional tank are diffused as we review God's character and remind ourselves that He is for us, not against us. Focusing on His character helps dispel discouragement! Furthermore, we are reminded that our enemies are really God's enemies. He is more powerful than any evil and more persistent than any difficult circumstance. As for those who try to harm us, the Lord is far more capable of dealing with them than we are.

It’s therapeutic to review the attributes of God—to remember He is always good and right in His ways.

Charles R. Swindoll Tweet This

Adapted from Charles R. Swindoll, Living the Psalms: Encouragement for the Daily Grind (Brentwood, Tenn.: Worthy Publishing, a division of Worthy Media, Inc., 2012). Copyright © 2012 by Charles R. Swindoll, Inc. All rights are reserved. Used by permission.

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